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Stories from Organizations – Part I

In this blog post I am going to talk about some stories of testers – These might or might not be real stories but you can relate this to your working in an organization or might have experienced.

Story #1 – Decrease in bug count for various reasons

There was a tester who was hired by some organization for testing their product. When he joined he was a less experienced ( Number of years ) when compared to other peers who were working with him. Initially, he found good bugs and reported them but later he was restricted a lot for different reasons and the bug count started decreasing. What went wrong? Did he stop reporting bugs? No, he did not but stopped reporting those kinds of issues that team or management did not want to see or they did not understand that it is an issue. Then he started reporting only those issues which were functional and he did not want to discuss any other issues as he knew that it would be a not worth.

Conclusion: Now he is NOT happy but his team and management is happy because of metrics.

Metrics Example: Less number of bugs ( Management Happy ), Less number of Non-reproducible bugs or rejected bugs ( Test Lead / Test Manager Happy ), Release on time ( Customer Happy – But later he / she might or might not be unhappy )

Suggested Reading:

  1. Jony Jony, Yes Papa! Following Process, Yes Papa …
  2. Usability of usability & performance of performance

Story #2 – I executed Test Cases & get salary but I am bored finally

After graduation a candidate attends interview and clears the interview and is hired as a tester in some organization.

Day #1: Tester comes in full enthusiasm and starts executing test cases which he / she have been taught how to execute in testing institutes from India. He is full happy and goes to home very merrily.

Day #2: Does the same thing as Day #1 with full enthusiasm and goes to home happily.

Day #3: Receives salary – He is happy again.

….

….

….

Day #99: Receives Salary – Not happy – Why?

Scripted Tester: I am bored executing test cases and writing pass or fail.

Conclusion: Test cases bore you. So how about eradicating them by following new approaches than traditional test case approach? Think about it. I ( Author ) understand that you might continue to oppose the idea and say on behalf of test case or scripted approach but before you conclude think more about it and do research on the different approaches and prove it what is better.

Suggested Audio Podcast: Test Plans Aren’t Ice Creams – Testing Stories from India by Pradeep Soundararajan

Story #3 – Metrics are to keep everyone happy :)

Tester: Why are you saying that my performance is not good?

Lead: Because you are not working for 0900 Hours

Tester: But I am finishing the work as assigned

Lead: You should to Ad-Hoc Testing

Tester: I do that and report them but you talked that your team rating would get hit if there are many non-reproducible or as-designed or some reasons which made me skeptical about reporting issues

Lead: You should understand the functional part of the product

Tester: Do you test only for functional?

Lead: No, we give it high priority

Tester: But, I haven’t seen other issues of different quality criteria. I think there is only functional testing that happens for this product

Lead: We have to show metrics to customer so please do some work of 0900 Hours daily

Tester: Thank you, I will continue to make happy everyone but your metrics will be incorrect

Conclusion: This story is little bit related to Story #1. Management is bothered about metrics and not really about what you do. Why collect metrics if they are incorrect? Fooling the customer?

More Stories to come… Keep watching… I would be glad enough to see your comments or opinions or anything. Thanks for your time in reading this blog post & have a nice time *smiles*.

SanthoshTuppad

I have been as a software tester for over 5 years. I am a hands-on tester and I've been winning bug battles & testing competitions across the world. I am a testing enthusiast, who conducts free workshops on security testing across India (Covered locations: Bengaluru, Pune, Hyderabad & Chennai. Invite him to come to your location), and monthly meets for testers in Bengaluru. I am also an avid testing blogger.

My interests include traveling, driving my SUV, health & fitness and many others. I mentor budding entrepreneurs, testers, teams in any profession.

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6 Comments

  1. @Story1,

    Conclusion: Now he is NOT happy but his team and management is happy because of metrics.

    I think he is doing a blunder. I hope you can help him. When the management doesn’t want to hear about a few kind of issues, not making notes of that or not attempting to find that is a bad idea.

    I will tell you why it is so. Bugs can teach you things that you may require for your next assignment. When they are coming on your way and you ignoring them is a bad idea.

    Plus, assuming for a period of 6 months that tester didnt report those bugs that the management is not interested to see but make a list of them. Once the list reaches, lets say 500, the tester could share that across with the management asking them, “Does 500 problems looks like a problem to them?”. If it doesn’t interest them then the tester has the list of 500 patterns of bug that he could use for his next assignment elsewhere. Plus working on bug advocacy helps.

    @ Story3

    Conclusion: This story is little bit related to Story #1. Management is bothered about metrics and not really about what you do. Why collect metrics if they are incorrect? Fooling the customer?

    That’s a good learning. Who is your customer? Ask yourself what are you fooling them with, maybe, sub consciously.

    You have to start building a culture in yourself that you wont fool your customers and clients. It could help when you become a test manager in future and also benefit your team.

    Santhosh, these are important experiences for learning. Think of it as God send opportunities for you to learn to be able to identify what good testing is. Don’t think, “Oh My God! Why are these happening to me”.

    I want to see a more positive writing in your blog. Maybe it would help me appreciate the content more than what I can today.

    Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 12:34 am | Permalink
  2. @Pradeep Soundararajan,
    Absolutely right. I realized it and thanks for your guidance. I might learn from those experiences but there are many testers who step back with these kind of experiences – I hope they understand and get out of such traps.

    Thanks,
    Santhosh Shivanand Tuppad

    Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 2:35 am | Permalink
  3. I might learn from those experiences but there are many testers who step back with these kind of experiences – I hope they understand and get out of such traps.

    Be more bothered about yourself. Those who bother about themselves will look into others good work and start making it their own.

    Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 3:16 am | Permalink
  4. @Pradeep Soundararajan,
    Absolutely right :) I need to modify the maxlength attribute as it is restricting you from having a space between your full name ( WordPress has maxlength attribute for comments name but through admin panel I could change it without modifying the source code – Inconsistency in different modules for the same feature ).

    Thanks,
    Santhosh Shivanand Tuppad

    Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 3:23 am | Permalink
  5. Good stories Santosh. I feel atleast in our country every tester might go thru this at some time or the other. As pradeep suggests how one tester would come out of such traps and what he learns from it makes all the difference.

    regards,
    Sharath

    Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 11:17 pm | Permalink
  6. @Sharath Byregowda,
    We would have spread cool messages to bring a change in the community faster if search engines would have helped us in listing my blog in top results :)

    Thanks,
    Santhosh Shivanand Tuppad

    Friday, June 11, 2010 at 12:27 am | Permalink

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